The Merry Widow
Winter Opera St. Louis

First and foremost among this production's many virtues is the uniform strength of its cast. Winter Opera has been somewhat uneven in this regard in previous the past, but this time around everyone is simply perfect, beginning with soprano Kathy Pyeatt, who demonstrated how to “glitter and be gay” (or quote a song title from Candide in the crucial role of Hanna. Her voice was liquid gold all the way to the top of its range, making the popular second act aria “Vilja” a thing of beauty. She’s also a fine actress, always in character even when not in focus

KDHX, Chuck Lavazzi

The Merry Widow, Hanna
Winter Opera St. Louis

The cast is splendidly strong. Kathy Pyeatt plays Hannah and sings with a very lovely strong soprano; she's capable of dramatic surges of power on her very highest notes. On her entrance she charmingly savors the adoration of twelve men. And can she wear those gorgeous gowns!

BroadwayWorld.com, Steve Callahan

The Merry Widow, Hanna
Winter Opera St. Louis

Both romantic couples were well-matched, both vocally and dramatically, and all four had great stage presence. The first, the widowed Hanna Glawari and her old flame Count Danilo, were taken by Kathy Pyeatt and tenor Clark Sturdevant. She has a fine soprano, along with the requisite worldly air that sets this role apart.

St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Sarah Bryan Miller

The Merry Widow, Hanna
Winter Opera St. Louis

Kathy Pyeatt showcased her sturdy and steady soprano admirably in the title role, but beyond that demonstrated a surprisingly engaging talent for comedy, too. She was particularly appealing in scenes with Clark Sturdevant as the elusive Count Danilovitsch, in which the two sparkled with fine on-stage chemistry.

Ladue News, Mark Bretz

Tosca, Tosca
Asheville Lyric Opera

As a whole, the ALO delivers musicality and heart-wrenching characterization in spades. Starring Kathy Pyeatt as the titular Floria Tosca, this tragic tale is told in a most expert fashion...... In the same scene, Pyeatt’s true claim to the role of Tosca becomes crystal clear. As Tosca is begging that Mario’s life be spared, Pyeatt seems to truly feel the heartbreak Tosca is experiencing; it shows through both her expressions and her voice. She is a greatly talented individual, bringing to life a character who is asked to be jealous, pious, talented, love-struck, vindictive, and at times, even evil. There is a great deal of pride in the character of Tosca, and the poise with which Pyeatt carries the role makes it seem as though it was made for her. This performance of “Vissi d’arte” (“I lived for art, I lived for love”) is a stunning emotional display, letting the audience know that the proud Tosca is not immune to heartbreak or sadness.

CVNC, Joshua Hutchins

Tosca, Tosca
Asheville Lyric Opera

The singers caught in the crosshairs of conflict were simply magnificent in their individual abilities and beautifully matched as an ensemble. Kathy Pyeatt sang the title role of Floria Tosca. Dressed in relatively simple empire-era gowns which accentuated her slender figure, Tosca appears less as theatrical diva and more like a vulnerable, ordinary woman....Tosca did not disappoint with her gut-wrenching "Vissi d'arte,” sung on her knees as Scarpia faces the back wall.

CVNC.org, Laura McDowell

Albert Herring, Lady Billows
Florentine Opera

Kathy Pyeatt was very funny as Lady Billows, who here emerged as less of the usual sour old English handbag and more of an impossibly pretentious, country-club Queen Bee from hell. Pyeatt used her blazing upper register to good effect as she bullied her minions into submission.

Opera News, Mark Thomas Ketterson

Albert Herring, Lady Billows
Florentine Opera

“The Florentine Opera’s production of Benjamin Britten’s comic masterpiece, Albert Herring, was a bounty of energized musical riches......the cast performed with an effortlessly joyous aplomb, in keeping with the light-hearted spirit of the work......The costumes designed by Holly Payne were surprisingly elaborate, especially those worn by Kathy Pyeatt as the aggressive Lady Billows, whose vocal and acting skills matched her outfits.”

Express Milwaukee, Steve Spice

Albert Herring, Lady Billows
Florentine Opera

The production's ensemble cast proved a nicely matched group of strong singers....Soprano Kathy Pyeatt was a formidable character and powerful musical presence as Lady Billows.

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Elaine Schmidt

Albert Herring, Lady Billows
Florentine Opera

A fine cast of alert singing actors....Just the right amount of stylization....I couldn’t look at Pyeatt without laughing; decked out in a puffed-up wig by Dawn Rivard and Payne’s voluminous gowns and hats, she projected ridiculous grandeur of a Spanish galleon under full sail.

Third Coast Daily, Tom Strini

Falstaff, Alice Ford
Winter Opera St. Louis

The opera is tuneful and filled with can’t-miss moments; it’s an ensemble piece that demands good singing, good acting and good humor. It had all of those things in good measure...as Alice, soprano Kathy Pyeatt was the requisite smart cookie, with a great voice and a knack for physical comedy.

St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Sarah Bryan Miller

Falstaff, Alice Ford
Winter Opera St. Louis

"It was clear that the performers cared as much about putting across the story as they did about singing...Kathy Pyeatt was very impressive as the self-possessed Alice Ford...another fine production from Winter Opera – my favorite of all I’ve seen from them."

‘Two on the Aisle’ HEC-TV, Gerry Kowarsky and Bob Wilcox

Don Giovanni, Donna Elvira
Asheville Lyric Opera

"Kathy Pyeatt created beautiful contrast to the light-heartedness the majority of the cast conveyed with her dismayed Elvira. With a voice that rang in sonorous love and devotion, her performance tugged at the heartstrings. When Pyeatt sang "Ah, fuggi il traditor," her desire to see Zerlina saved from heartache reached into the audience as if she were trying to warn us of the deceitful man."

Classical Voice North Carolina, Olivia Willie

Opening Night Gala, Soloist
Rockford Symphony Orchestra

The program cover promised “Music that ignites your passion!” The orchestra, with guest soprano Kathy Pyeatt, delivered........She has a strong, vibrant voice that thrills on her shining high notes. Her best number was the Beethoven, a vocally gymnastic piece that uses the full range of the voice. Pyeatt carried off the thoughtful midrange passages beautifully and brought passion to this song, which is about the love Leonora has for her imprisoned husband, Florestan.

Libby Parker, Rockford Register Star

Cosi Fan Tutte, Flora (Fiordiligi)
Skylight Opera Theatre

"I believed soprano Kathy Pyeatt when she poured out her heart, reluctantly, to her new suitor...And after all this, what about the singing? It's very good, particularly Pyeatt's wide vocal and dramatic range as Flora..."

David Lewellen, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Cosi Fan Tutte, Flora (Fiordiligi)
Skylight Opera Theatre

"Soprano Kathy Pyeatt (as Fiordiligi, called Flora here) had shining vocal moments in long held, spun high notes."

Rick Walters, Shepherd Express

Cosi Fan Tutte, Flora (Fiordiligi)
Skylight Opera Theatre

"Kathy Pyeatt and Lindsey Falduto shone as Flora (Fiordiligi) and Dora (Dorabella) from the moment the sisters woke up in the morning to go to the office and sang their opening duet."

Marianne Kordas, Third Coast Digest

Cosi Fan Tutte, Flora (Fiordiligi)
Skylight Opera Theatre

"Kathy Pyeatt's voice is impeccable...."

Julie McHale, Waukesha Freeman

Annelies (Whitbourn), Soloist
Key Chorale

Key Chorale triumphs with music in 'Annelies'......With a voice that easily conveyed the innocence amid increasingly worldly worries, soprano soloist Kathy Pyeatt was most impressive in her portrayal of the character through tone, expression and even her presence on stage when not singing."

Gayle Williams, Herald Tribune

The Abduction from the Seraglio, Constanza
Skylight Opera Theatre

“Pyeatt's Constanza gives the show moral weight. She looks great and moves gracefully in the rich, period costuming that Stacey Galloway lavishes on the show. And her singing equals the richness and elegance of the clothes. Pyeatt, a bit player around here for years, has lately sung big roles in small companies out of town, but I hadn't heard her in a couple of years. She seemed to step into Constanza and suddenly became important and mature, attuned to every harmonic and emotional nuance. Pyeatt sang atop reserves of strength; this was a big voice relaxing into Mozartean scale and coloratura and the friendly confines of the Broadway Theatre Center.”

Tom Strini, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

The Abduction from the Seraglio, Constanza
Skylight Opera Theatre

“Pyeatt is meant for the part with her strong and expressive soprano voice, plus (she) has the right look and refined quality….Pyeatt and Gagnon also do a beautiful job of portraying the physicality of their ardor wrapped in each others arms, tenderly caressing as they sing of their love for each other.”

Barbara Zaferos, CNI Newspapers

La Traviata, Violetta
Opera Theatre North

“passionate in the extreme….Soprano Kathy Pyeatt is no shrinking Violetta. Pyeatt is as slim and pretty as a model, but her voice is strong and she hits the high notes without strain. She skillfully makes the scenes between the two lovers incandescent…When her dying Violetta is suddenly enlivened by Alfredo’s return and sings joyfully, Pyeatt makes us believe for a moment that his love has actually made her well again….this Violetta and her Alfredo fill it completely with the beauty and the sadness of their tragic love.”

Dorothy Andries, Pioneer Press

Chants d'Auvergne, Soloist
Rockford Symphony Orchestra

Guest artist, soprano Kathy Pyeatt, no newcomer to the RSO, was featured soloist in five selections from “Songs of the Auvergne” by Joseph Canteloube. Sung in French, each folk song had its own distinct mood. One was rather frivolous, another somber and sad, and still another pensive. Pyeatt is blessed with a remarkably clear and strong voice, and when combined with her intense emotional identification with the lyrics, it made for a stellar performance. The audience expressed enthusiastic appreciation with a strong applause for her and the RSO."

Nat Bauer, Rockford Register Star

Carmen, Micaela
Springfield Regional Opera

“As Micaela, the innocent country girl who loves and loses Don Jose, soprano Kathy Pyeatt brings a warm and luscious sound to her two big numbers, the duet with Don Jose in Act One and her soaring solo in Act Three.”

Larry T. Collins, Springfield News-Leader

The Magic Flute, First Lady
Florentine Opera Company

The Three Ladies - Kathy Pyeatt, Rebecca Olthafer and Colleen Brooks - vied amusingly to be the first among equals. They looked smashing in black gowns by Christianne Myers and showed impeccable musicianship in their ensemble numbers.

Tom Strini, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

The Magic Flute, First Lady
Florentine Opera Company

The trio of queen’s Ladies found balance and nuance in the Mozart’s lovely harmonic writing.

Paul Kosidowski, Milwaukee Magazine

The Magic Flute, First Lady
Florentine Opera Company

The three Ladies-in-Waiting and the spirits were equally up to their tasks. They sang and acted their roles with complete sovereignty.

Paul Masterson, Quest

L’elisir d’amore, Adina
St. Petersburg Opera

“Riveting performances………..gorgeous voices……….wonderful acting…….Pyeatt has a luminous voice and presence.”

Marty Clear, St. Petersburg Times

The Barber of Seville, Berta
Skylight Opera Theatre

The whole cast meshed in this way, right down to Bryce Lord in the mute role of the servant Ambrogio and the superb Kathy Pyeatt, a star-quality singer, who gave her all to the tiny role of Berta.

Tom Strini, ThirdCoast Digest

The Barber of Seville, Berta
Skylight Opera Theatre

Skylight's ensemble cast of strong, theatrically savvy singers make both the music and the shenanigans work........Daniel Klein (Basilio), Kathy Pyeatt (Berta), Bryce Lord (Ambrogio) and Doug Clemens (Fiorello) give thoroughly enjoyable, polished performances, joined with equal strength by Peter Voigt, David Flores and a male chorus for larger numbers.

Elaine Schmidt, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Exsultate Jubilate, Soloist
Milwaukee Chamber Orchestra

“Pyeatt’s voice is big and weighty midrange down and brilliant on top. She has a gift for the long, lyrical line: Mozart gave her many such lines to sing, and they were ravishing. Pyeatt’s sturdy breath support, power and range suggest a Verdian dramatic soprano in development.”

Tom Strini, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Exsultate Jubilate, Soloist
Milwaukee Chamber Orchestra

“Pyeatt returned to deliver a well-received reading of Mozart's often-heard Exsultate, Jubilate. Her musicality shone with elegance.”

Charles Grosz, Shepherd Express

A Mozart Tribute, Soloist
Rockford Symphony Orchestra

“Operatic excerpts were a special treat of the evening, giving us full dramatic scenes with soprano Kathy Pyeatt rendering Donna Elvira’s blending of the heat of revenge with the pain of rejection, both with undertones of unrequited love, in her aria from Don Giovanni; and then Costanza’s response from “Abduction from the Seraglio (or Harem),” which challenges any coloratura soprano with its pyrotechnics and sweeping two-octave range and rapid runs. Pyeatt dazzled us all with her success in meeting the challenge, never compromising the rich tones of her fine voice.”

Georgia Pampel, Rockriver Times

Gypsy Love, Ilona
Light Opera Works

"Director Jutocsa's more strenuous attempts to enliven "Gypsy Love" are outweighed by his cast's vocal prowess..…….Genuine triple threats are hard to come by in this line of work. Kathy Pyeatt appears to be one. Pyeatt plays the merry widow Ilona— merry widow! There's a title in that!"

Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

Gypsy Love, Ilona
Light Opera Works

“Thrilling singing makes these three hours fly by..... Most marvelous is Kathy Pyeatt as the Gypsy's worldly-wise admirer: she turns every phrase into a discovery and makes it look easy.”

Lawrence Bommer, Chicago Reader

Gypsy Love, Ilona
Light Opera Works

“Beautiful voices poured from the stage of Cahn Auditorium in Evanston Sunday during the Light Opera Works production of Franz Lehar’s “Gypsy Love.”... Kathy Pyeatt from Milwaukee lit up the stage as Ilona, the wealthy widow with an eye on the gypsy boy.”

Dorothy Andries, Pioneer Press

Gloria (Poulenc), Soloist
Bel Canto Chorus

"The first half was filled by the Poulenc, a "modern" piece that breathed fresh life into ancient Latin texts when it premiered in 1961. Hynson and chorus gave a solid, thoughtful performance of the piece, joined by some glorious vocal work from soprano Pyeatt. She sang with a controlled, polished sound, moving effortlessly through the piece's leaping lines and giving elegant shape to its simpler passages."

Elaine Schmidt, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Bach to Bach, Soloist
Key Chorale

Soprano Kathy Pyeatt and mezzo Rachel Assi made an excellent impression in their solos in the “Birthday Ode to Big Daddy Bach” and a hilarious Choral Cantata called “Knock, Knock,” in which corny but highly amusing knock-knock jokes became Baroque-ly unabashed belly blasters.

June LeBell, Your Observer Sarasota

Il Trovatore, Inez
Florentine Opera

“Perhaps the finest group of Verdi singers the Florentine Opera has ever assembled opened the company's season Saturday, with "Il Trovatore."…The quality extended right through the secondary roles…Kathy Pyeatt, as Inez, more than held her own in several exchanges with Phillips' Leonora.”

Tom Strini, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Il Trovatore, Inez
Florentine Opera

“Kathy Pyeatt sang Inez with idiomatic Verdi style.”

Maria Nockin, Opera Japonica

Il Trovatore, Inez
Florentine Opera

“Kathy Pyeatt contributed nicely as Inez.”

Mark Thomas Ketterson, Opera News On-line

Peasant Cantata, Soloist
Bach Chamber Choir

“From the overture, in which the exaggerated contrast of the two themes foretold the humorous material to follow, it was a delight. The young soloists, Soprano Kathy Pyeatt and Baritone Paul Busselberg, both have fine voices as well as the musical taste to succeed in a wide variety of productions. From their separate operatic backgrounds, they knew how a touch of flirtation conveyed by facial expression, gesture, and a twinkle in the eye, helped bring the Cantata to life……But the highlight that stayed with me as a memory to hold always was the Pie Jesu, (“Merciful Lord Jesus, Give them rest eternal), performed by the trio of Soprano Pyeatt, Cellist Beert and Organist Rooney, so well blended and balanced that they sounded as a single instrument, a new sound to enchant the soul.”

Georgia Pampel, Rockriver Times

Master Class, Sharon Graham
Milwaukee Chamber Theatre

“Possibly her (director, Norma Salvidar) most telling contribution is casting the superlatively voiced Kathy Pyeatt as the student Sharon Graham. When Sharon sings beautifully, completely taking over the stage, she suddenly towers over Callas, changing the teacher-student dynamic.”

Gordon Spencer, Shepherd Express Metro

The Magic Flute, Queen of the Night
DuPage Opera Theatre

“All of the leads were impressive, but Pyeatt's Queen was certainly a standout. By quickly adjusting to a technical glitch in Act I, she allowed the performance to proceed without interruption. Her aria in Act II, when she is demanding that her daughter kill Sarastro, was performed with great verve and was pitch-perfect.”

Gary Puckett, Chicago Beacon News

Gloria (Poulenc), Soloist
Rockford Symphony Orchestra

"Soloist Kathy Pyeatt joined the chorus in the much slower and reflective third and fifth sections, “Domine Deus” and “Domine Deus, agnus Dei”. Each had difficult intervals requiring extraordinary skill, yet performed masterfully."

Nat Bauer, Rockford Register Star

The Christmas Schooner, Alma Stossel
Family Playhouse Theatre

“Husband-wife team Kathy Pyeatt and Dan Kerkman anchor the show wonderfully as Alma and Peter Stossel. Pyeatt convincingly leads us through the roller coaster life of a devoted captain’s wife, who must cope with the agony of waiting for her husband as he embarks on dangerous waters along with the joy of his triumphant return.”

Warren Bluhm, Door County Advocate

The Christmas Schooner, Alma Stossel
Family Playhouse Theatre

“Anchoring the cast of women storytellers is Alma the Captain's wife, played by noted soprano Kathy Pyeatt. Her superlative vocal delivery sets the high mark, challenging the entire cast to extend themselves.”

Lars Larson, Door County Compass